Effects of teen dating violence

Teens may not call it “dating” but studies show that by the time they are in middle school, many young people are involved in intimate, romantic dating relationships.

A study by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation found that 75 percent of seventh graders report having a boyfriend or girlfriend.

This leads to an increase in the number of relationships that go south.Teenage romantic relationships are more likely to turn violent when: Teens are also sponges – they absorb what they see and hear in the world around them.It’s also more common than many believe – in part because it tends to be misunderstood and under-reported.Some teens, as well as some adults, hold beliefs about relationships that say “it’s okay” or “normal” for emotional and physical abuse to happen within intimate relationships.Emotional abuse includes behaviors such as name calling, threatening, insulting, shaming, manipulating, criticizing, controlling access to friends and family, expecting a partner to check in constantly, and using technology like texting to control and batter.

Teen dating violence is a serious public health issue.Nearly 25% of teenage girls are estimated to have been in an abusive relationship.In fact, girls between 16 and 24 are as likely than any other demographic to be abused by a boyfriend or other intimate partner.According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), each year about one in 11 teens report being a victim of physical abuse – and one in five teens report being a victim of emotional abuse.Physical abuse includes behaviors such as shoving, pushing, hitting, slapping, punching, kicking and grabbing.Dating is an inevitable part of life that many experience for the first time as a teenager.